Games I wouldn't be here without

Discussion in 'Gaming' started by Apollos, May 24, 2017.

  1. Apollos

    Apollos Level 7 (Cutpurse) LitRPG Author Citizen

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    As a writer and fan of the litrpg genre, there are games that got me to where I am now. As a list, these are the ones that were essential along my path to litrpg!

    Dragon Warrior (NES)
    This was the first rpg I played that introduced me to grinding to level my character, fight harder mobs, and get mad loot!

    Though there were other rpgs the next one captured my imagination and introduced rpg storytelling to me at a level that I didn't know possible.

    Final Fantasy VII
    No other game had such an impact on me as ffvii. I'm not sure any other ever will. I was a teenager and torn between two girls with materia socketed into my sword... Brah!

    Nexus -Kingdom of the Winds
    First mmo that was in the 2d style of Ultima Online. From the 90s and still going strong. Mandatory role playing and no out of character. Necessary grouping to kill mobs and grow. Unique gear that was limited in the world so you could be one of a few to walk around with a cool sword.

    From that point on, all other rpgs have just added fuel to the fire.

    What and put you? How did you get here?
     
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  2. WildAzazel

    WildAzazel Death's TP Supplier Roleplaying Shop Owner LitRPG Author Citizen Aspiring Writer

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    Fable, Legacy of Kain, Dungeons and Dragons all on the xbox and then WoW. I beat Fable and LoK. I enjoy D&D with my son every now and then and I've played WoW to level 35 with a druid but thats the extent of my gaming really. I love the concept of leveling up, I just don't have the time to game. I get all that out in one session of larp per month, a few conversation and this forum and writing.
     
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  3. Seagrim

    Seagrim Level 18 (Magician) LitRPG Author Citizen

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    For PC Master of Magic, Master of Orion

    Console Shadowhearts and Final Fantasy vii

    Paper and Pencil Dungeons and Dragons, Cyberpunk 2020, Champions, Rolemaster

    I'm really an old skool paper and pencil gamer who discovered computer games.
     
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  4. R.M. Soderlund

    R.M. Soderlund Level 7 (Cutpurse) Citizen

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    Hi! What a great thread...

    For me, it started with adventure/puzzle games on PC - Myst and Riven.
    I also have such fond memories of single player RPGs like Dragon Age Origins; Fallout 3; Skyrim (of course!) and more recently, the Witcher 3. I have probably sunk 100+ hours into each title.
    I tend to play less MMO's, but the ones I have spent quite a bit of time in are Guild Wars 2; Path of Exile; Star Wars: The Old Republic.

    I think the experience of playing each of these games has influenced my litrpg writing. I see common threads in the strong emphasis on exploration, character conflict, problem solving, epic fantasy settings, ... ect.

    How wonderful that we can become better at our craft through gaming :)
     
  5. Jun

    Jun Level 12 (Rogue) LitRPG Author Citizen

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    Anything and everything Old World of Darkness.
    World of Warcraft

    I practically lived and breathed the two above for over a decade. WoD more so than WoW.

    Those are the two big ones, though I've certainly enjoyed other RPGs over the years. I think the first console game that got me hooked on RPGs was Final Fantasy II (though I did play Dragon Warrior on the NES and FF1). Neverwinter Nights (and NWN2) deserve honorable mentions, and I've been playing Summoners War for the last few years.
     
  6. RedCulver

    RedCulver Level 6 (Footpad) LitRPG Author Citizen Aspiring Writer

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    For me, it's all about Final Fantasy VI (originally released as Final Fantasy III in the US). I still consider this the best video game of all time. It pushed the graphics and sound capabilities of the SNES to the absolute limit, and is just so completely engaging that I still, 25 years after it came out, have to stop myself from playing it again because I know I won't be able to get anything else done until I finish it. From a game design perspective, it also sits right in my sweet spot. Each playable character has a unique battle mechanic with its own rules and quirks, which gives you a lot to learn as a player, but avoids the massive, totally open-ended skill/feat trees of later games, which always give me analysis paralysis. The combat rules are just complicated enough that you have to pay attention, but not so much that an eager ten-year-old can't grasp them immediately and have fun.

    I also play a lot of Dungeons & Dragons. These days it's either 5e or B/X, but I grew up on 2e.
     
  7. Berserk

    Berserk Level 8 (Thug) Beta Reader Citizen Aspiring Writer

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    Damn I feel like a little kid with all of these classics being thrown around. My first game that got me interested in RPG's was Oblivion. That game is also what converted me from the Xbox to PC as I owned it on both platforms, but the game wasn't nearly as good on console without mod support. I started playing Pathfinders in university a few years ago, and most recently Divinity II has driven me to seek out other RPG stories. Eden's Gate and The Land was all it took to convert me to a LitRPG faithful.

    The lack of Great War material is what decided to make me attempt writing. As a programmer I was always taught that if you can't find something then make it yourself. I think I'll be leaning towards more of the GameLit side of the spectrum though that was being discussed in the Level Up thread. I want to look at what happens when technology in a fantasy world encroaches on the power of magic. Why spend years training mages for your army when you can just give them a rifle and send them to the front line after a week of training. Why spend half your life questing for various ancient swords and epic armor when odds are you'll be blown up by a shell fired from artillery you can't even see. At least that is the consensus being reached by the npc nations in the game world. Because of that even weaker players are more powerful relative to the common npc soldier.
     
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  8. Yuli Ban

    Yuli Ban Level 17 (Theurgist) LitRPG Author Citizen Aspiring Writer

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    [​IMG]

    I've played many RPGs in my time on this Earth, but if I had to strictly answer the OP's question then the game that truly sent me here is this one since this was the root of that 10-year-old proto-litRPG story I keep mentioning (which I might as well just switch out with "Astral Falls" since that's the purest adaptation of it thus far).
    It's not the first RPG I played nor is it the best nor is it the first one to which I created my own story, but the aesthetic and plot are directly why I got into litRPG in the first place. I just find the concept of a Challenge Anneka-style game enticing, though I feel that it would probably be best served by social credit/AR gamelit.

    If I had to go indirect and point to games that simply sent me down this path but didn't necessarily kick off my interest in the genre, where else should I even bother to start but the grandaddy of modern open world action RPGs?
    [​IMG]

    I can't tell you how many hours I've sunk into this 30-year-old game in my life. It's never fully obsessed me, but I've played it enough that you'd be forgiven for thinking otherwise. Completely by accident without the internet or Nintendo Power, I figured out how to skip to the second quest, how to bring up the secret save screen, how to keep the mook count low in any particular room, and how to one-shot Gohma. All this because my dad found an old NES in our attic.

    Outside of RPGs, the game that I keep coming back to as an inspiration for how to create things is none other than:
    [​IMG]

    And its two prequels/expansions. How many times have I said "I'm a child of Grand Theft Auto" on the forums? To be blunt, I like the GTA series (especially the III-era trilogy) precisely because it's like an action RPG without the stats, and I think this drove a lot of my thinking when playing other games. During the time I did play World of Warcraft (a vanilla edition, mind you), I didn't much get invested in it because of the need to level up. That's not to say I didn't like the game or the setting— GTA just molded my preference where I'd rather be able to do whatever I can do, equip whatever I need to equip, from the start.
    If I had Knights of the Old Republic on PC (if publishing turns out well and I make decent money, I'll get a new computer and catch up on old games), the first thing I'd do is get a mod that allows me to start out at level 20 so I can allocate my attribute and skill points accordingly. Hell, when I discovered it existed, I played through Skyrim extensively just to get the Oghma Infinium so I could max my level out and skip all the grinding. Coincidentally, that's when I started really getting into the game.

    TL;DR, the one thing I don't like about RPGs is the main thing that defines them— the grind. GTA didn't have any grinding up until San Andreas (where it still wasn't really that important); the only things that were locked were different sections of the map and even that changed for GTA 5. Grinding works better in litRPG, ironically, because it is a good representation of growth.
    I suppose the main reason why I didn't get tired of grinding in The World Ends With You is because I was already playing the game extensively for a time so I just grinded naturally trying to unlock everything. In MMOs, I've learned, it usually works the other way around. You have to reach the endgame to see everything the game has to offer. Personally, that's more my style, and it's a good reason why I'll probably find an MMO that I really friggin' enjoy at some point. Otherwise, when you discover everything the game has to offer just to reach the endgame max-level, it kind of feels a bit like a let down unless the game has a ton of replayability or a new-game plus mode.



    Another game that pushed me towards litRPG was the one whose concept was what I'd been craving to see:
     
  9. RedCulver

    RedCulver Level 6 (Footpad) LitRPG Author Citizen Aspiring Writer

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    This is something I would read! I've done a little work on a black powder/Age of Fighting Sail RPG setting for D&D, but WWI-era tech would also make for a great setting.
     
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